Bioengineering, embodied subjectivity, and biomedical trash: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Kishwar Desai’s origins of love

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dc.contributor.author Karmakar, Manali
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-07T07:08:59Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-07T07:08:59Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.other ROLL NO.146141027
dc.identifier.uri http://gyan.iitg.ernet.in/handle/123456789/1546
dc.description Supervisor: Avishek Parui en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines selected fictional representations of ethical, emotional and existential anxieties triggered by developments made in the domains of bioengineering like artificial reproductive technology (ART), organ transplantation, and human cloning. The historical framework of this research is the period 1818-2012, and this study aims to examine how selected literary representations are ontologically equipped to critique conventional understandings of lived realities that are discursively determined by medico-legal classifications of embodiment, agency, human subjectivity, personhood, citizenship, and family. The main objective of this thesis is to foreground how selected literary representations of the sociocultural and political status of bioengineered lives enable us to reflect with renewed attention on the current culture of biocapitalization that, on the one hand, has produced flawless human commodities and on the other hand, has created a class of bioengineered beings classified as disposable lives exploited for biomedical purposes and are subsequently converted into biomedical trash. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries TH-2209;
dc.subject BIOSCIENCES AND BIOENGINEERING en_US
dc.title Bioengineering, embodied subjectivity, and biomedical trash: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Kishwar Desai’s origins of love en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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